Mammals of the Mountain Slopes

Mountains and alpine environments have long been a refuge for mammals, so what happens when there’s increased human access and development in this terrain? By following remote wilderness cameras, scientists have been able to track animals to see how they’ve been adapting to the change. In this article from Jason T. Fisher and Alina C. Fisher highlight grizzly and wolverines as well as considerations for future developments.

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How Can Mountain Tourism Embrace Sustainability? Through Tourist-Operator Collaboration

Between the 2016/17 and 2017/18 seasons, over 9.2 million visitors found themselves at one of Parks Canada’s seven mountain parks - that’s a lot! With increasing tourism and operations surrounding the industry, how do we keep up with the traffic while maintaining positive impact? In this article from Elizabeth Halpenny, she suggests that sustainability in the industry and on our mountains relies on tourist-operator collaboration in educating and providing opportunities for change.

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Living and Breathing Change: A Southern Tutchone Perspective on Climate and Research

Kluane First Nation (KFN) citizen Tosh Southwick and KFN staff member Kate Ballegooyen write from the viewpoint of an indigenous community in the face of climate change. They speak about the necessary need in their community to change and adapt as crossings melt and water levels lower, and the vital partnership that should exist when future decisions and policies on climate change are made to Traditional Territory.

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Climate change to test mountain communities

While climate change is on the radar for most us, mountain communities will be among the first to feel challenged by its affects. In this article, Kevin Hanna writes about how mountain people are at the gates of climate change and how resilience and adaptation will be necessary to understand the risks and actions required to maintain a successful community.

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The Mountain Legacy Project: Exploring 150 Years of Landscape Change in the Canadian Mountain West

Early surveying efforts in Canada has provided us with a large database of high-quality images, dating back as far as 1861. The Mountain Legacy Project (MLP), based at the University of Victoria in the School of Environmental Studies, has been using these images to explore change in Canada’s mountain landscapes. By accessing and comparing old images to new, the MLP is able to document and display changes in our landscape, from glaciers, treelines, vegetation encroachment to wildfire habits.

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The shifting states of alpine treelines in Canada

What does climate change have to do with treelines shifting to higher and higher altitudes? And what does this mean for animal species relying on alpine ecosystems?

This piece from Carissa D. Brown explores our diverse treelines across Canada - what keeps them alive in certain locations and what facilitates, slows down or prevents their expansion.

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